mythologyofblue:

The way to hold on is

afterwords
so
clear.

-Anne Carson, excerpt from “New Rule” +

(via kdecember)

The Beach Boys – I Just Wasn't Made For These Times (0 plays)

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didsomeonesaythebeatles:

George and Pattie with Ringo on set of a Hard Day’s Night

didsomeonesaythebeatles:

George and Pattie with Ringo on set of a Hard Day’s Night

(Source: pinterest.com, via twoweeksoflovemaking)

Richard Linklater’s Leading Boy (x)

(Source: mrgolightly, via futuraism)

(Source: lostcivilization, via swinginglikeafistfight)

Hitting up bogs

Hitting up bogs

amsoheavy:

The Royal Tenenbaums

(Source: im-your--superhero, via roverofhighdegree)

papermagazine:

Bikini Kill photographed for Paper, April 1992. Fun fact: The Beastie Boys were on the cover of this issue.

papermagazine:

Bikini Kill photographed for Paper, April 1992. Fun fact: The Beastie Boys were on the cover of this issue.

(Source: shadow-priest, via saudadecity)

Spring forward, fall back down

Trying not to wonder where you are

(Source: Spotify)

Carrey Mulligan in An Education, directed by Lone Scherfig (2009)

(Source: cinyma, via twoweeksoflovemaking)

theswinginsixties:

The Rolling Stones: Brian Jones

theswinginsixties:

The Rolling Stones: Brian Jones

(Source: musicboys, via twoweeksoflovemaking)

wandrlust:

Wes Anderson and Owen Wilson at Sundance in Provo, Utah, 1993

Wes Anderson, Luke Wilson, and Owen Wilson during the production of Bottle Rocket (1996)

From The Wes Anderson Collection

(via twoweeksoflovemaking)

(Source: 4tones, via oldhorse)

Grimes – Oblivion (82,945 plays)

The song recounts a specific sexual assault (“One of the most shattering experiences of my life,” Grimes, who was born in Vancouver as Claire Boucher, told SPIN in 2012) by describing the psychic fallout: “And never walk about after dark/ It’s my point of view/ Because someone could break your neck/ Coming up behind you always coming and you’d never have a clue,” she lisps in her high, pinched voice. It’s a dazzling, paralyzing performance, in part because Boucher sounds almost playful, and in part because the skronking behind her—the song’s springy, propulsive synth line was one of 2012’s most unforgettable—indicates something other than victimization. “See you on a dark night,” Boucher repeats. […] But what “Oblivion” ultimately offers is victory. It’s the sound of one woman turning personal devastation into not just a career-making single, but a lasting anthem of transformation.

Grimes’ Oblivion is the best song of the decade - so far.

(Source: ozhin, via wehateyourhate)